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This Wednesday, Kitsilano Secondary Grade 11 student Bryn Shaffer and dozens of other students from across Metro Vancouver had their voices broadcasted across BC as part of CBC News Day.

CBC News Days is an internship program started four years ago aimed at exposing secondary students to all the excitement of being a broadcast, online, radio or print journalist.

Johnny Michel, Managing Director of CBC British Columbia says the program has been enthusiastically embraced by the whole CBC staff with a wide range of anchors, reporters and producers lending a hand as mentors. He notes the program has also had a positive influence on the lives of many of the 120 students who have participated so far.

 "It has been fascinating to see the impact on students who have participated and how the experience itself broadens their horizons," says Michel.

Speaking on the Early Edition this Wednesday morning, Shaffer talked about the challenges faced by students looking to complete the career transition program while juggling homework, volunteer services and other activities.

Shaffer's piece was the culmination of roughly 72 hours of research, interviewing, editing, writing and recording work that started in late January. She says it was a rewarding process from the start. In late January, she along with 500 other students from across Metro Vancouver turned up at the CBC building downtown. There were only 30 spots open. Each student got a four minute on camera audition where they were asked to tell a personal news story idea.

After a steady performance, Schaffer learned a few weeks later that she'd made the cut and was assigned to work with CBC radio in the newsroom. Other students got to work in CBC TV while others were given a chance to meet and work with top journalists at the Vancouver Sun.

The student journalist says she was most surprised by how hard it was to track down interview subjects. She said that while everyone was happy to talk to her when she identified herself as a secondary student, when she said she was with the CBC, suddenly everyone clammed up.

Shaffer acknowledges that while she's not interested in going into journalism, she is interested in honing her skills as a storyteller to use in her dream profession as a film director or screen writer. She says the CBC gig was a perfect fit.

If you'd like to listen to Shaffer's story - click here and fast forward to the final segment of the podcast.

CBC News Day a Big Hit for VSB Students

This Wednesday, Kitsilano Secondary Grade 11 student Bryn Shaffer and dozens of other students from across Metro Vancouver had their voices broadcasted across BC as part of CBC News Day.

CBC News Days is an internship program started four years ago aimed at exposing secondary students to all the excitement of being a broadcast, online, radio or print journalist.

Johnny Michel, Managing Director of CBC British Columbia says the program has been enthusiastically embraced by the whole CBC staff with a wide range of anchors, reporters and producers lending a hand as mentors. He notes the program has also had a positive influence on the lives of many of the 120 students who have participated so far.

 "It has been fascinating to see the impact on students who have participated and how the experience itself broadens their horizons," says Michel.

Speaking on the Early Edition this Wednesday morning, Shaffer talked about the challenges faced by students looking to complete the career transition program while juggling homework, volunteer services and other activities.

Shaffer's piece was the culmination of roughly 72 hours of research, interviewing, editing, writing and recording work that started in late January. She says it was a rewarding process from the start. In late January, she along with 500 other students from across Metro Vancouver turned up at the CBC building downtown. There were only 30 spots open. Each student got a four minute on camera audition where they were asked to tell a personal news story idea.

After a steady performance, Schaffer learned a few weeks later that she'd made the cut and was assigned to work with CBC radio in the newsroom. Other students got to work in CBC TV while others were given a chance to meet and work with top journalists at the Vancouver Sun.

The student journalist says she was most surprised by how hard it was to track down interview subjects. She said that while everyone was happy to talk to her when she identified herself as a secondary student, when she said she was with the CBC, suddenly everyone clammed up.

Shaffer acknowledges that while she's not interested in going into journalism, she is interested in honing her skills as a storyteller to use in her dream profession as a film director or screen writer. She says the CBC gig was a perfect fit.

If you'd like to listen to Shaffer's story - click here and fast forward to the final segment of the podcast.

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