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On a stormy Wednesday, over a dozen students from Winston Churchill Secondary got a first hand experience of how court cases work as they undertook a mock trial around the responsibility of school boards when it comes to preventing bullying.

The case touched on the tragic bullying case of fictional character Max Lee who was assaulted at school by the bully Zee after days of harassment. The case proactively explored the liability of school districts through the witness statement of fictional school students, counsellors, principals, teachers and even Facebook comments between students.

Students were given roles of plaintiff and defense lawyers as well as clerks, witnesses, and even bailiff. The whole trial was presided over teacher candidate Michael Molson, a trained lawyer, who played the role of judge and was responsible for building the mock trial from the ground up.

Molson says with recent high profile cases around bullying in the US and Canada, the topic is particularly fresh and interesting for many of his students.

"The subject is timely and as a result the students are very interested in it - with the success of the recent films on bullying and the Premiers' rhetoric, there are actually a lot of social policy, ethical and legal dimensions to the question once the rubber hits the road," said Molson.

On a stormy Wednesday, over a dozen students from Winston Churchill Secondary got a first hand experience of how court cases work as they undertook a mock trial around the responsibility of school boards when it comes to preventing bullying.

Churchill Mock Trial at BC Supreme Court Kindles Imagination

On a stormy Wednesday, over a dozen students from Winston Churchill Secondary got a first hand experience of how court cases work as they undertook a mock trial around the responsibility of school boards when it comes to preventing bullying.

The case touched on the tragic bullying case of fictional character Max Lee who was assaulted at school by the bully Zee after days of harassment. The case proactively explored the liability of school districts through the witness statement of fictional school students, counsellors, principals, teachers and even Facebook comments between students.

Students were given roles of plaintiff and defense lawyers as well as clerks, witnesses, and even bailiff. The whole trial was presided over teacher candidate Michael Molson, a trained lawyer, who played the role of judge and was responsible for building the mock trial from the ground up.

Molson says with recent high profile cases around bullying in the US and Canada, the topic is particularly fresh and interesting for many of his students.

"The subject is timely and as a result the students are very interested in it - with the success of the recent films on bullying and the Premiers' rhetoric, there are actually a lot of social policy, ethical and legal dimensions to the question once the rubber hits the road," said Molson.

On a stormy Wednesday, over a dozen students from Winston Churchill Secondary got a first hand experience of how court cases work as they undertook a mock trial around the responsibility of school boards when it comes to preventing bullying.

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