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Each month, Patricia Morris, a Kindergarten teacher at Renfrew School, teaches the children in her class about a different well known artist. Part of the exercise involves taking a piece of famous art and copying their style for their own work. Morris says her students always do a fabulous job.

In November, the children produced a copy of a work by Mel Bochner, a well known artist from New York City.  Morris had seen his work in the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Inspired, she designed a math lesson in numeral formation to tie into the art lesson for her Kindergarten students.

The result was golden. In fact Morris was so proud of the results that she sent photographs of the children's artwork to the artist last week and was thrilled to receive the following quick reply.

"Please thank all of the kids in your class for putting so much care and thought into their work," wrote Mel Bochner. "When I made these works, I was trying to see the world as a child might. Having your class redraw my vision of an unpremeditated world, through their own unpremeditated eyes, brings that project to a poetic conclusion that I could never dreamed of."

Mel Bochner's Counting Rocks

Renfrew Elementary Sees Art Go Full Circle

Each month, Patricia Morris, a Kindergarten teacher at Renfrew School, teaches the children in her class about a different well known artist. Part of the exercise involves taking a piece of famous art and copying their style for their own work. Morris says her students always do a fabulous job.

In November, the children produced a copy of a work by Mel Bochner, a well known artist from New York City.  Morris had seen his work in the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Inspired, she designed a math lesson in numeral formation to tie into the art lesson for her Kindergarten students.

The result was golden. In fact Morris was so proud of the results that she sent photographs of the children's artwork to the artist last week and was thrilled to receive the following quick reply.

"Please thank all of the kids in your class for putting so much care and thought into their work," wrote Mel Bochner. "When I made these works, I was trying to see the world as a child might. Having your class redraw my vision of an unpremeditated world, through their own unpremeditated eyes, brings that project to a poetic conclusion that I could never dreamed of."

Mel Bochner's Counting Rocks

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