www

Alisha Fredriksson is heading south this winter - way south. The Grade 11 Prince of Wales Mini School student is one of 60 students from around the world selected to participate on a scientific exploration trip to Antarctica.

The trip is part of a large scientific education experience aimed at exposing students to the real and hidden effects of climate change on the globe's poles. During the trip, she will travel first to Toronto and then to Buenos Aires where she will board the MV Ushuaia and travel for 12 days among the Antarctic icebergs and wildlife.

During the trip the students will liaise with 30 explorers, scientists and researchers to discover, conduct youth led research seminars, study the unique international affairs issues of the area, conduct ice-core sampling and scout for penguins, seals and Antarctic birds. While Fredriksson admits penguin spotting is definitely an expected highlight, she says it's the chance to meet a range of new people on the trip that's particularly exciting.

"Networking with people around the world is something that is really interesting. As time passes the world needs to be even more connected in order to deal with climate change," she says. "It's important to learn about what people around the world have to say because we have such different perspectives."

Want to read more about the trip? Check out this great Vancouver Courier article.

Photo courtesy of John E. Lester

PW Mini Student Heads to Antarctica

Alisha Fredriksson is heading south this winter - way south. The Grade 11 Prince of Wales Mini School student is one of 60 students from around the world selected to participate on a scientific exploration trip to Antarctica.

The trip is part of a large scientific education experience aimed at exposing students to the real and hidden effects of climate change on the globe's poles. During the trip, she will travel first to Toronto and then to Buenos Aires where she will board the MV Ushuaia and travel for 12 days among the Antarctic icebergs and wildlife.

During the trip the students will liaise with 30 explorers, scientists and researchers to discover, conduct youth led research seminars, study the unique international affairs issues of the area, conduct ice-core sampling and scout for penguins, seals and Antarctic birds. While Fredriksson admits penguin spotting is definitely an expected highlight, she says it's the chance to meet a range of new people on the trip that's particularly exciting.

"Networking with people around the world is something that is really interesting. As time passes the world needs to be even more connected in order to deal with climate change," she says. "It's important to learn about what people around the world have to say because we have such different perspectives."

Want to read more about the trip? Check out this great Vancouver Courier article.

Photo courtesy of John E. Lester

Back to top