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This year, Nigel Reedman's Grade 12 graphic design class got to put their talents to the test with a real world challenge - design an original logo for a real client: the Developmental Skills Program at Van Tech.

Individually or in teams of two, the students set to work. Their first task was to gather information about the DSP program teacher. DSP teacher Regan Rankin helped give the graphics students background information to ensure that the logo properly reflected the values and general background of the program. 

Different elements, like puzzle pieces, were integrated into the artwork to showcase the "complexity and mystery of the autism spectrum."

When the designs were finished the DSP students were tasked with choosing the design that they felt best represented their program.

DSP"This was a very difficult decision with so many fantastic designs!" said Rankin. "By creating this project, it was my hope that not only was a fun, challenging and educational experience for the graphic design students but that it would foster a better understanding and empathy about some of their peers at Van Tech."

Rankin says both objectives were accomplished. The winning design really stood out and will now become the new "visual" face of the program. Rankin says the program intends to put it onto hoodies for the staff and students in the DSP program.

"We will all wear our hoodies with great pride knowing they were made with so much thought and care by the talented students at Van Tech," she says.

Van Tech Graphics Students Design Logo for Developmental Skills Program

This year, Nigel Reedman's Grade 12 graphic design class got to put their talents to the test with a real world challenge - design an original logo for a real client: the Developmental Skills Program at Van Tech.

Individually or in teams of two, the students set to work. Their first task was to gather information about the DSP program teacher. DSP teacher Regan Rankin helped give the graphics students background information to ensure that the logo properly reflected the values and general background of the program. 

Different elements, like puzzle pieces, were integrated into the artwork to showcase the "complexity and mystery of the autism spectrum."

When the designs were finished the DSP students were tasked with choosing the design that they felt best represented their program.

DSP"This was a very difficult decision with so many fantastic designs!" said Rankin. "By creating this project, it was my hope that not only was a fun, challenging and educational experience for the graphic design students but that it would foster a better understanding and empathy about some of their peers at Van Tech."

Rankin says both objectives were accomplished. The winning design really stood out and will now become the new "visual" face of the program. Rankin says the program intends to put it onto hoodies for the staff and students in the DSP program.

"We will all wear our hoodies with great pride knowing they were made with so much thought and care by the talented students at Van Tech," she says.

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